Catholicism and Phenomenology - ACPQ Special Issue, Summer 2021

American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly Special Issue

Summer 2021 (volume 95, number 3)

 Catholicism and Phenomenology

Guest editors

Michael Bowler

Michigan Technological University

mjbowler@mtu.edu

Mirela Oliva

University of St. Thomas, Houston

olivam@stthom.edu

 

This special issue of American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly is intended to examine and promote phenomenological approaches (widely construed) to philosophical issues arising within and emerging from Catholicism and Catholic philosophy.  Papers may, for example, (1) exposit and analyze exemplary figures and movements within the Catholic tradition of phenomenological philosophy; (2) examine how a phenomenological approach would benefit Catholic philosophy; (3) examine tensions between phenomenology and Catholic philosophy and/or Catholicism; or (4) discuss contemporary attempts to reexamine, from a phenomenological perspective, issues of concern to Catholic philosophers.  Each article, including abstract and notes, should be 10,000 words or less.

Send submissions by email directly to the guest editors.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 1, 2020

 


CFP - Society for 21st Century Thomism: On Citizenship

Society for 21st Century Thomism: Call for Papers

On Citizenship

Deadline for Submission: May 6th, 2019

The proper nature of “citizenship” has been a topic of discussion in the history of political philosophy since the beginning, and one of practical importance to any political regime. Citizens are the basic, material foundation of any state, and so it is important to ask: What makes one a citizen? What rights and privileges do citizens enjoy over non-citizens? What responsibilities should the citizen have in particular? When asking these questions, immediately we see a dichotomy between citizen and non-citizen residents of the state.

Historically, immigration in the United States is tied to citizenship as a telos. That is, the immigrant is encouraged to assimilate, to participate in the existing community and culture. Today, immigration is seen by many as an end in itself, wherein there is no further expectation to assimilate into the community. Here, it is more important to speak of immigrant rights and multicultural cosmopolitanism (i.e., being a “citizen of the world”). For those who adhere strictly to these ideals, it is an affront against the personal dignity of the immigrant to expect assimilation.

This is a difficult problem. On the one hand, we can affirm that immigrants have inherent rights consequent to their dignity as human persons. However, on the other hand, “a house divided against itself cannot stand.” Without assimilation, there is a real danger in loosening the bonds that keep the nation together, such that our neighbor is now closer to a stranger. Yet, as Catholics, we also have a Christian duty to help those who are needy and oppressed, which tends to be the prime motivator for those who leave their home country.

The Society for 21st Century Thomism is asking for papers in light of these questions above from an Aristotelian-Thomistic foundation. Papers should address these questions in a Neo-Thomistic fashion, that is, not merely by summarizing St. Thomas’ own comments on citizenship or his replies to similar matters in his own time, but by examining the thought of St. Thomas and later Thomists on these issues to draw conclusions that teach us, in our own time, how to address the particular issues we face now.

We are interested in papers addressing the following questions:

• What is a citizen? What separates a citizen from a non-citizen resident?
• What duties do we have as citizens? What rights are we given as citizens?
• What expectations do immigrants, as non-citizen residents, have to meet within the community or state?
• What rights do immigrants have from the state?
• How are citizens and non-citizens justly represented under our democracy?
• Who is our “neighbor” in a community? What ties the community together?

Papers on related topics will also be considered. We invite you to submit an abstract by May 6th, 2019. Each paper presentation at the session will be 25 minutes, and an additional 10 minutes for Q&A. We will respond to each submission in mid-to-late May. Please address inquiries and abstracts (the latter as a Microsoft Word file attachment) to this year’s session organizer, Francisco E. Plaza, at plazaf@stthom.edu.


John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow at PRRUCS, University of Pennsylvania

The Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society at the University of Pennsylvania invites applications for a one-year postdoctoral fellowship for a scholar conducting research on the work of Elizabeth Anscombe.  

The John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow serves the Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society (PRRUCS) in the School of Arts and Sciences.

In 2018, PRRUCS and the University of Pennsylvania library obtained the papers of G.E.M./Elizabeth Anscombe (Anscombe Archives). The papers in the Anscombe Archives have only recently been made available for researchers affording the John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow a unique opportunity to conduct research on one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century. The John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow will conduct original research and write at least two scholarly articles using the Anscombe Archives as their principal source documents. 

PRRUCS will co-sponsor events, workshops, and conferences related to research associated with the Anscombe Archives and related to the work of its Perry Family Scholars for Science, Spirituality, and Service. The John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow will lead all phases of the planning and implementation of the Anscombe events; and assist in the planning and implementation of the Perry Family Scholars for Science, Spirituality, and Service Events. 

The John and Daria Barry Foundation Fellow is a one-year term appointment.

For more information and to apply, please view the position posting here: https://jobs.hr.upenn.edu/postings/43293

--------------------------
John Buchmann
Associate Director and Theologian-in-Residence, Collegium Institute
PRRUCS-Perry Fellow, Program for Research on Religion and Urban Civil Society, Univ. of Pennsylvania
3814 Walnut Street
Leadership Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6197
(724) 549-4516

ACPA 2019 Outreach and International Collaboration Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals

ACPA members are invited to submit grant proposals for projects relating either to (a) international collaboration or to (b) outreach within the USA and Canada. Proposed projects in the first category should aim at supporting philosophical communities in countries other than the USA and Canada, or at the dissemination of philosophical ideas to a broader public in countries other than the USA and Canada. Proposed projects in the second category should aim at the dissemination of philosophical ideas (tied to the Catholic intellectual tradition) either to a broader public in the USA or Canada or to faculty and students at institutions in the USA or Canada where the Catholic intellectual tradition is underrepresented.

For this year (2019) and next year (2020), the ACPA will invite proposals. Up to $12,000 per year will be given away.

Eligibility:

Any ACPA member associated with an institution of higher learning is eligible to submit a proposal to have a project funded. (Grants will be made to institutions, not to individuals.)

Deadline for proposals:

Proposals should be emailed to Michael Rota at mwrota@stthomas.edu by July 10th, 2019. Decisions will be announced by December 1, 2019.

Criteria of evaluation:

Proposals focused on international collaboration will be evaluated on their potential either to strengthen philosophical communities in countries other than Canada and the USA, or to disseminate philosophical ideas to a broader public in those countries. Other things being equal:

1)      projects that focus on topics of special interest to Catholic philosophers will be preferred to those that do not,

2)      proposals that will primarily benefit philosophers (including students of philosophy) in countries with comparatively fewer funding opportunities for philosophical work will be preferred to proposals which will primarily benefit philosophers (including students of philosophy) in countries with comparatively greater funding opportunities, and

3)      a less expensive project will be funded over a more expensive project.

Proposals focused on outreach within Canada and the USA will be evaluated on their potential to disseminate philosophical ideas from the Catholic intellectual tradition to a broader public or to an academic community where the Catholic intellectual tradition is currently underrepresented. Other things being equal, a less expensive project will be funded over a more expensive project.

Application process:

Projects should have a single project director who submits the proposal and who will take responsibility (if the project is funded) for reporting back to the ACPA upon completion of the project. The project director must be a member of the ACPA at the time of submission of the project and during the duration of the project. Projects can have 1-3 co-directors.

A proposal should include:

(a)    The name and contact information of the project director, and, if applicable, of the project co-director(s).

(b)   A narrative statement of no more than 2000 words explaining the project. This statement should specify a start-date and end-date for the project, not to exceed 2 years, and should identify one or more outputs, which are concrete events the project will be expected (if funded) to bring about (e.g. a conference on topic X in location Y, or a series of 3 lectures by so-and-so in region R, or a short-term seminar taught by philosopher X at university or seminary U).

(c)    A budget, not to exceed $12,000.

(d)   CVs of the project director and, if applicable, co-director(s).

Financial process and reporting:

By an approved project’s start date, funds will be sent by the ACPA to the project director’s institution, and from that point on distribution of funds will be carried out by the project director through his or her institution. The project director will be expected to submit a report to the ACPA upon completion of the project. The report should, at a minimum, (a) state whether the output(s) was(were) achieved, (b) state whether all funds were used (if not, unused funds should be returned to the ACPA), and (c) describe any salient details about the perceived success or failure of the project.


ACPA 2019 Outreach and International Collaboration Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals

ACPA members are invited to submit grant proposals for projects relating either to (a) international collaboration or to (b) outreach within the USA and Canada. Proposed projects in the first category should aim at supporting philosophical communities in countries other than the USA and Canada, or at the dissemination of philosophical ideas to a broader public in countries other than the USA and Canada. Proposed projects in the second category should aim at the dissemination of philosophical ideas (tied to the Catholic intellectual tradition) either to a broader public in the USA or Canada or to faculty and students at institutions in the USA or Canada where the Catholic intellectual tradition is underrepresented.

For this year (2019) and next year (2020), the ACPA will invite proposals. Up to $12,000 per year will be given away.

 

Eligibility:

Any ACPA member associated with an institution of higher learning is eligible to submit a proposal to have a project funded. (Grants will be made to institutions, not to individuals.)

 

Deadline for proposals:

Proposals should be emailed to Michael Rota at mwrota@stthomas.edu by July 10th, 2019. Decisions will be announced by December 1, 2019.

 

Criteria of evaluation:

Proposals focused on international collaboration will be evaluated on their potential either to strengthen philosophical communities in countries other than Canada and the USA, or to disseminate philosophical ideas to a broader public in those countries. Other things being equal:

1)      projects that focus on topics of special interest to Catholic philosophers will be preferred to those that do not,

2)      proposals that will primarily benefit philosophers (including students of philosophy) in countries with comparatively fewer funding opportunities for philosophical work will be preferred to proposals which will primarily benefit philosophers (including students of philosophy) in countries with comparatively greater funding opportunities, and

3)      a less expensive project will be funded over a more expensive project.

Proposals focused on outreach within Canada and the USA will be evaluated on their potential to disseminate philosophical ideas from the Catholic intellectual tradition to a broader public or to an academic community where the Catholic intellectual tradition is currently underrepresented. Other things being equal, a less expensive project will be funded over a more expensive project.

 

Application process:

Projects should have a single project director who submits the proposal and who will take responsibility (if the project is funded) for reporting back to the ACPA upon completion of the project. The project director must be a member of the ACPA at the time of submission of the project and during the duration of the project. Projects can have 1-3 co-directors.

A proposal should include:

(a)    The name and contact information of the project director, and, if applicable, of the project co-director(s).

(b)   A narrative statement of no more than 2000 words explaining the project. This statement should specify a start-date and end-date for the project, not to exceed 2 years, and should identify one or more outputs, which are concrete events the project will be expected (if funded) to bring about (e.g. a conference on topic X in location Y, or a series of 3 lectures by so-and-so in region R, or a short-term seminar taught by philosopher X at university or seminary U).

(c)    A budget, not to exceed $12,000.

(d)   CVs of the project director and, if applicable, co-director(s).

 

Financial process and reporting:

By an approved project’s start date, funds will be sent by the ACPA to the project director’s institution, and from that point on distribution of funds will be carried out by the project director through his or her institution. The project director will be expected to submit a report to the ACPA upon completion of the project. The report should, at a minimum, (a) state whether the output(s) was(were) achieved, (b) state whether all funds were used (if not, unused funds should be returned to the ACPA), and (c) describe any salient details about the perceived success or failure of the project.


9th Annual Thomas Aquinas Philosophy Workshop

Sponsored by:

The Catholic and Dominican Institute Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY
The Thomistic Institute Dominican House of Studies, Washington, DC
The Notre Dame Center for Ethics & Culture, Notre Dame, IN

Topic:  Aquinas on Human Action and Virtue

Dates:
June 19-23, 2019

Location:
  Mount St. Mary College
330 Powell Avenue
NewBurgh, New York

Featuring:

James Brent, OP, Dominican House of Studies

Fr. Stephen Brock, Pontifical University of the Holy Cross

Edward Feser, PhD Pasadena City College

Fred Freddoso, PhD University of Notre Dame

Steven Long, PhD Ave Maria University

John O'Callaghan, PhD University of Notre Dame

Fr. Michael Sherwin, OP, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

Candace Vogler, PhD University of Chicago


Symposium Thomisticum IV

Dates: Rome, 4 – 6 July 2019

The fourth Symposium Thomisticum will take place in Rome, 4 – 6 July 2019.

Theme of the symposium will be ‘Aquinas Philosopher Theologian’.

The venue is the Collegio Irlandese, centrally located near the church of St John Lateran.

Details are available at www.ucd.ie/philosophy/symposiumthomisticum (google Symposium Thomisticum).

Speakers will include Serge-Thomas Bonino, Therese Cory, Kevin Flannery, Joshua Hochschild, Ed Houser, Gyula Klima, Patrick Masterson, Siobhan Nash-Marshall, John O’Callaghan, Paul O’Grady, Fran O’Rourke, Alice Ramos, Andrea Robiglio, Mary Catherine Sommers, Rudi Te Velde, Candace Vogler, Giovanni Ventimiglia, Kevin White. Other speakers to be confirmed.

Papers are invited for supplementary parallel sessions on the afternoon of Saturday 6 July. While topics on any aspect of Aquinas are welcome, priority will be given to those relating to philosophy and theology. To avoid overlap, initial proposals should be sent by email to Fran O’Rourke, Emeritus Professor, School of Philosophy, University College Dublin (orourke@ucd.ie).

The deadline for abstracts is 1 January, and for completed papers 1 June 2019.

Papers will be circulated in advance; summaries will be presented at the symposium: papers will be discusssed rather than read.

Participation fee will be €150 to include refreshments and the conference banquet. Reduced student registration: €125.

Accommodation: Rooms are available at the Collegio Irlandese, approx $100 for bed and breakfast. All rooms are air conditioned; there is a swimming pool in the spacious grounds.

All inquiries to Fran O’Rourke, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, University College Dublin (orourke@ucd.ie).

 


Call for Abstracts - North American Society for Social Philosophy

36th Annual International Social Philosophy Conference

The 36th Annual International Social Philosophy Conference will be held at the

University of San Francisco

July 11-13, 2019

Sponsored by the North American Society for Social Philosophy

with the Department of Philosophy, University of San Francisco

 

Call for Abstracts

Proposals in all areas of social philosophy are welcome, but special attention will be devoted to the theme:

Home: Sanctuary, Shelter, and Justice

Some possible paper topics include:

·         Membership in families

·         Membership in communities

·         Group identity

·         Transnational identities

·         Identity, immigration, and assimilation

·         Caregiving and care receiving

·         Care and Justice: Compatibilities and Incompatibilities

·         Collective activity and/or collective care

·         The ethics of social practices

·         The status of community and home in an age of political division

·         Citizenship and civic obligation

·         Proper citizenship

·         Neoliberalism and social responsibility

·         The effects of health and well-being on security

·         Public institutions security

·         Philosophical perspectives on sanctuary, shelter, and/or justice

·         Philosophical perspectives on discrimination

·         Sanctuary and “homeplacing”

·         Sanctuary, shelter, and living “in-between” worlds

·         Sanctuary, shelter, and justice as related to gender

·         Philosophical perspectives on welcoming and openness

·         Philosophical perspectives: What it means to be at home and/or homeless

·         Homeless in the academy: Conservative political philosophy

·         Future society and/or technology in reference to the meaning of home

·         Feeling at home/homeless in reference to gender

·         Religious belief and the feeling of home/homeless

·         Religious belief and security, justice, and/or shelter

·         The connection between food, water, and security

·         Recreation, play, and social concerns

·         Leisure and the common good

·         Classical philosophical perspectives on the meaning of community

·         Educating for social justice and/or citizenship

·         Educational rights in reference to immigrants and the homeless

·         Educational levels and feeling at home within society

We welcome submissions from both members and non-members, but we require that all presenters join the North American Society for Social Philosophy if their papers are accepted and if they present at the conference.

Submission Deadline:  February 15, 2019. Please submit a 300 word abstract at: http://www.northamericansocietyforsocialphilosophy.org/call-for-abstracts/

Questions? contact@northamericansocietyforsocialphilosophy.org.

The Program Committee:
Geoff Karabin, Neumann University (chair)
Roksana Avali, University of Oklahoma
Laura Kane, University of Tampa

Local host:  Jeff Paris, University of San Francisco
David Stump, University of San Francisco
Ron Sundstrom, University of San Francisco

Members of the Program Committee may be reached at:
program@northamericansocietyforsocialphilosophy.org

NASSP Support for International Presenters
The NASSP will waive fees for conference registration and for the banquet for those participants traveling from outside of the United States and Canada.

NASSP Conference Awards for Graduate Students:
The North American Society for Social Philosophy has established the NASSP Awards for Best Graduate Student Papers to promote new scholarship in social philosophy and to encourage student participation in our Conference.

The winners of the annual prizes. The prizes are awarded only to conference attendees, though there is no obligation to use the money for conference-related costs. Any graduate student enrolled in a program towards a degree beyond the B.A. or first university diploma is eligible.

The paper may address any topic in social philosophy. Papers should be no more than 3,000 words (include a word count with submission), and they should conform to the requirements set out by the APA for colloquium submissions to annual Divisional meetings.

Those who want to be considered for this award should send their full papers on or before February 15 to gradaward@northamericansocietyforsocialphilosophy.org – and they should also submit abstracts to the site by February 15, 2019.

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About the ACPA

Since 1926, scholars and thinkers, mostly based in Canada and the United States, have forged a unique tradition and community known as the "American Catholic Philosophical Association." Steeped in classical sources and cultivating the Catholic Philosophical heritage, this tradition is known for creative engagement with major philosophers of every era and bold responses to the themes and issues of contemporary philosophy. 

Contact Information

Membership Services: 

A.C.P.A. membership services are handled by the Philosophy Documentation Center. Inquiries regarding membership - including membership status, changes of address (or other contact information), and status of ACPQ or ACPA Proceedings subscriptions - should be directed to the PDC at:

ACPA Subscription and Membership Services 
Philosophy Documentation Center 
P. O. Box 7147 
Charlottesville, VA 22906-7147 - USA 

Tel. 800-444-2419 (US & Canada) 
Tel. 434-220-3300 
Fax: 434-220-3301 
E-mail: order@pdcnet.org 
Web: www.pdcnet.org

All U.S.P.S. mail for the national office should be sent to:

ACPA National Office 
Center for Thomistic Studies, 
University of St. Thomas 
3800 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006 

Phone: (713) 942-3483 
Fax: (713) 525-6964

E-Mail Correspondence should be sent to: acpa@stthom.edu 

The business office may be contacted at:

ACPA Subscription and Membership Services 
Philosophy Documentation Center 
P. O. Box 7147 
Charlottesville, VA 22906-7147 - USA 

Tel. 800-444-2419 (US & Canada) 
Tel. 434-220-3300 
Fax: 434-220-3301 
E-mail: order@pdcnet.org 
Web: www.pdcnet.org

E-Mail regarding this web site should be directed to:acpa@stthom.edu